My GitHub Instructable (while convalescing)

While a resident artist at Autodesk, we are supposed to write many Instructables. Often, the temptation is to make your projects and then write the how-to-guides in a haste.

Since I broke my collarbone, I really can’t make anything physical, but I can type one-handed. Besides the daily naps and the doctors’ appointments, and slowly doing one-handed chores like sorting laundry, I have to keep my mind active (I’m still too vulnerable up to go outside on my own).

Here is a new one: an Introduction to Git and GitHub. I originally found this source-control system to be weird and confusing, but now I’m 100% down with it. Feel free to add comments on the guide, as I’m a relative Git/GitHub nOOb and also have a thick skin for scathing Linux criticism.

Full Instructable here:
http://www.instructables.com/id/Introduction-to-GitHub/

And here is my post-surgey selfie from yesterday, where they put the pins in my collarbone. The doctors told me it went well. All I know is that I woke up feeling groggy with extra bandages on my shoulder. That’s how easy it is these days.

post_surgery_selfie

Fabrication Challenge — Faceted Forms

The fabrication challenge for some of my new sculptures is to devise a way to transform models in 3D screen-space into faceted painted wood forms. The faceted look is something I first experimented using papercraft sculptures in the No Matter (2008) project, a collaboration with Victoria Scott.

nm_yellow_submarine

I later expanded upon this idea with the 2049 Series sculptures such as the Universal Mailbox and the 2049 Hotline. I constructed these sculptures from found wood at the dump while an artist-in-residence at Recology SF.

The problem I had getting the weird angles to be exact. I don’t have strong woodworking skills and ended up spending a lot of time with bondo fixing my mistakes. I’d like to be able to make these on the laser-cutter…no saws and no sanding and have them look perfect. Stay tuned.

malbox phonebooth

 

Cracking the Code

After some several days of brainstorming on generating 3D models using simple coding tools, I started diving into Processing* using Marius Watz’s Modelbuilder Library (which is incredible). This is what I have going so far. Super-excited about the possibilities!algo_3d

Version 2 with “clustering” algorithm
clustering

* Technically speaking, I’m  using the Processing libs with Eclipse, which makes development far easier. This Instructable that I wrote shows you how to migrate your Processing projects to Eclipse.

 

@marktwainbot + Bot Cache

Lately I’ve been obsessed with Twitterbots and just a few days ago, I wrote my first one: @marktwainbot — a simple quotebot, which sends a tweet every day at the exact hour and minute of Mark Twain’s death. The quotebot isn’t super-exciting, but I wanted something that was easy to make and was a proof of concept for future Twitterbots.

97n/24/huty/7252/18

I used a Raspberry Pi to make this happen and wrote the code in Python, using Twython. For the gathering quotes, I tried the the crowdsourced-labor site: TaskRabbit, which made me feel like I was exploiting a 20-something woman in New York, until it became clear she was doing this during her own work time and so was being double-paid. Full steps for the project will soon be available as an Instructable.

My friend Ben Valentine recently e-troduced me to An Xiao Mina, artist, research and journalist, who is collaborating with folks on Bot Cache, a compendium of Twitterbots, currently in alpha development.

Here’s a short video of her talking about Twitterbots — compelling stuff!

 

Apple’s Jailhouse (part 1)

Open Video Sync is one of my Eyebeam projects and will be a way to turn your iPhone or iPod touch into a cheap and wireless video synchronization tool.

We have unfortunately come to the conclusion that we will have to release this as a jailbroken application which means it will be released on the Cydia Store rather than the Apple Store (here is a glossary of what these terms mean) which means restricting the audience to a more tech-savvy group, but there is no other way.

televisor

The bone of contention is the use of undocumented interfaces and there is specifically one called the MPTVOutInterface which lets you playback video onto an external device. Apple doesn’t support this for the development community which is a foot-shooting maneuver.

First of all: any video player should have a direct-to-device output. In fact, here is a great iPhone hardware hack that will let you do just that.

Second: this is already something that works for Apple’s own iPod video player. It is well-tested and should be folded into the general API.

The shoot-in-foot problem is this: it is only a matter of time before the open source Google Android phone catches up. Right now, it still lacks the necessary inter-phone communication via Bluetooth/wireless API. And also the phone is too expensive, requiring a service plan. The iPod touch is an excellent model: cheap, great UI and a lot of application support. Hopefully the Android will come up with a similar model sooner than later.

Apple could profit from iPhone-as-gaming device such as this example.

In the meantime, my co-developer, Eric Brelsford and I have decided to jailbreak and go Cydia on this one.  Stay tuned.

OVS & GPL & BSD

This week I’ve been researching what type of open source license to use with the Open Video Sync (OVS) project — one of the many things I’ve got going on at Eyebeam.

ovs_logo_white_300px

Open Video Sync will do amazing things for video artists (and others), namely the ability to synchronize video playback across multiple cheap video players, such as the iPod touch.

The legal issue is that OVS is an iPhone application and is therefore running on an essentially developer-unfriendly and closed environment. In addition to the numerous restrictions that Apple imposes upon developers, including esoteric developer’s certificates and provisioning profiles, programmers have to pay $99 fee to download their custom programs onto their mobile devices.

After meeting with Fred Benenson today, it became clear to me that iPhone development presents problems with the GPL namely that it is not free software. This means that I will end up deploying the software with a more liberal, BSD-style license.

Why not Google Android — a device that is open? Simply: iPod Touches are cheap, require no service plan and  the iPhone SDK supports inter-phone communication. Some day, I’d like to port Open Video Sync to a more open platform, but not until it is cost-effective for users.