Mapping Emergency Drinking Water Hydrants

Did you know that San Francisco has 67 fire hydrants that are designed for emergency drinking water in case of an earthquake-scale disaster? Neither did I. That’s because just about no one knows about these hydrants.

While scouring the web for Cistern locations — as part my Water Works Project*, which will map out the San Francisco water infrastructure and data-visualize the physical pipes and structures that keep the H2O moving in our city — I found this list.

I became curious.

67_drinkingfountains

I couldn’t find a map of these hydrants *anywhere* — except for an odd Foursquare map that linked to a defunct website.

I decided to map them myself, which was not terribly difficult to do.

Since Water Works is a project for the Creative Code Fellowship with Stamen DesignGray Area and Autodesk and I’m collaborating with Stamen, mapping is essential for this project. I used Leaflet and Javascript. It’s crude but it works — the map does show the locations of the hydrants (click on the image to launch the map).

The map, will get better, but at least this will show you where the nearest emergency drinking hydrant is to your home.

map_link

Apparently, these emergency hydrants were developed in 2006 as part of a 1 million dollar program. These hydrants are tied to some of the most reliable drinking water mains.

Yesterday, I paid a visit to three hydrants in my neighborhood. They’re supposed to be marked with blue drops, but only 1 out of the 3 were properly marked.

Hydrant #46: 16th and Bryant, no blue dropIMG_0022

Hydrant #53, Precita & Folsom, has a blue dropIMG_0016

Hydrant #51, 23rd & Treat, no blue drop, with decorative stickerIMG_0011

Editors note: I had previously talked about buying a fire hydrant wrench for a “just in case” scenario*. I’ve retracted this suggestion (by editing this blog entry).

I apologize for this suggestion: No, none of us should be opening hydrants, of course. And I’m not going to actually buy a hydrant wrench. Neither should you, unless you are SFFD, SFWD or otherwise authorized.

Oh yes, and I’m not the first to wonder about these hydrants. Check out this video from a few years ago.

* For the record, I never said that would ever open a fire hydrant, just that I was planning to by a fire hydrant wrench. One possible scenario is that I would hand my fire hydrant wrench to a qualified and authorized municipal employee, in case they were in need.

2 comments

  1. Bret Lobree says:

    As a person who has ridden every road in SF on my bike I find stuff like this fascinating. Glad to see someone else geeks out on this stuff. Just wondering, other than the water source how are these different? Does the SFFD still use them to fight fires? If you open one for emergency water how do you control the flow? Thanks,bret

  2. Bret Lobree says:

    Couple more things…how do I follow your project and I think I’ve seen a map with the cistern locations…did you find that yet. Lastly, the emergency broadcast speakers could be fun to add…kind of like above ground plumbing…

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