Producing Art via 3D printing

Let’s not get too excited until the reviews come out, but it’s always nice to receive some advance press coverageScreen Shot 2015-03-30 at 10.04.17 PM.

For this upcoming show, which is at the Peninsula Art Museum in Burlingame, I will be presenting my Data Crystals artwork. These have been written about extensively in the press, but not yet shown in an exhibition. That’s how it works sometimes.

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Exhibition Details:

What: “3D Printing: The Radical Shift”
When: April 26 through June 28
Hours: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays
Opening reception: 1-2 p.m. (members only), 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. (general public) April 26
Where: Peninsula Museum of Art, 1777 California Drive, Burlingame

Artist Talk @ Plug-in

Tonight, Victoria Scott and I gave a solid talk at Plug-In Gallery in Winnipeg, with support from Erika Lincoln and the Winnipeg Arts Council.

Here, I am with an old friend, Ken Gregory, artist, hardware hacker and kinetic sculpture of many decades. It was great to see him again after nearly 5 years.

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I co-presented with Victoria, who showed some of her own work as well as some of our collaborative work. We also introduced our ReFILL workshop, which starts tomorrow (!).

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Ken’s artwork is much better than his photography skills. Here, I am partially cut-off. Hey this happens, sometimes. I’ll publish it anyhow.

Otherwise, the talk went great. We got a “Winnipeg reception”, which meant that folks seemed very interested — no cell phone distractions — but at the same time, hardly any questions, either. The feedback was that folks were “reserved”. Ah, welcome to Canada where people are, well…perhaps more genuine.

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I <3 Classroom Artist Talks

Here’s my dirty secret. If you pay me a small stipend, I will come to your class and talk about my artwork. It’s one of my favorite things to do.

Last week, it was Jenny Odell’s class at the San Francisco Art Institute: Probing Social Networks. Her work is smart and I’ve been a fan, so perhaps it’s the case of the mutual admiration society. The two of us finally met in person at an opening at Recology San Francisco, where I was once an artist-in-residence (2011) and where she will soon spend some time digging through trash.

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My “playlist” covered more of the internet-art projects with some discussion of imaginary objects and virtual data:

No Matter (2008)
Second Front (2006-)
Wikipedia Art (2009)
Tweets in Space (2012)
Playing Duchamp (2009)
Data Crystals (2014)
Water Works (2014)
EquityBot (2014)

The classroon talks are relatively easy to do. Very little prep is required since I’ve spoken about all these project oodles of times. I do these talks mostly, because I remember so many of the artists that came through my MFA grad program and each and every one of them helped me develop my art practice. I want to return the favor.

With a high-level class like this, you always get some good questions. The one project that the students seemed most engaged by was EquityBot, which was both surprising — since it’s a stock-investment algorithm and inspiring since it’s my latest project.

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Water Works, Google Translated

My Water Works data-visualization was just featured in MetaTrend Journal (“Big Datification”, Volume 63, March 2015). It’s a subscription model, so you can’t read the article, plus it’s in Korean, which means I definitely can’t read it.

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I did get some partial text emailed to me from the organization and run it through Google translate, which gave me this paragraph:

Water Works project is implemented as a map to visualize 3D printing coming drainage and sewer systems of San Francisco . This is a project of visual artist Scott Kjeldahl data . San Francisco 170 water tanks visualize dozen water tank location (San Francisco Cisterns), 3 million , and visualize data points sewers activity (Sewer Works) and was made ??up of 67 of the most efficient virtual hydrant (Imaginary Drinking Hydrants) Map . Pipes, hydrants , circulation and the supply of urban waterways flow through the location and construction of a sewage treatment plant can see at a glance.

I like it! Once again Google Translate impresses with the odd results and the mangling of phrases.

ReFILL Workshop in Winnipeg

On March 27th & 28th (2015), Victoria Scott and I will be conducting a workshop in Winnipeg around the “libricide” in Canada’s DFO libraries. The full article on their closures is here.

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Here’s the description
On March 27th & 28th, 2015, San Francisco-based artists Victoria Scott and Scott Kildall will be leading 2-day, hands-on workshop to physically re-imagine and re-materialize some of the lost titles of the Freshwater Institute Library. We will discuss, imagine, draw, map and construct while listening to soothing water sounds and watching water-related videos. We will also discuss methodologies of data visualization and create a map which tracks the migration of these materials from publicly-funded resource into private hands and landfill.

Our project blog will always tell more!

Death and Language

This Thursday at 6pm at Root Division, I will be part of evening of conversation and performance.

The short talk I’ll be giving will be called Death and Language.

In 1972, my father, Gary Kildall, wrote the first high-level computer language for Intel’s microprocessors. This language, called PL/M was instrumental in the development of the personal computer and is now extinct. At around the same time, the last fluent speaker of the Tillamook language also died, thus extinguishing this natural language. What survives of the Tilamook language are audio recordings taken from 1965-1972. With digital preservation techniques as the backdrop, I will entertain questions regarding death of both natural and machine languages.

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Pier 9 Artist Profile

The good folks at Pier 9, Autodesk just released this video-profile of me and my Water Works project. I’m especially happy with Charlie Nordstrom’s excellent videography work and even got the chance help with the editing of the video itself.

Yes, in a previous life I used to do editing for video documentaries with now defunct, Sleeping Giant Video and the IndyMedia Center.

But now, I’m more interested in algorithms, data and sculpture.

Wikipedia and the Politics of Openness by Nathaniel Tkacz

I first met Nathaniel Tkacz, in India and then later in Amsterdam for a series of the Wikipedia CPOV (Critical Point of View) conferences. At these two events, my colleague, Nathaniel Stern and I were presenting a talk, which later became a paper on our Wikipedia Art project.

Congratulations to Nathaniel Tkacz. He has just released his book, Wikipedia and the Politics of Openness, which is covered in this Times Higher Education article by Karen Shook.

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Talk at David Baker Architects

Yesterday, I gave a brief artist talk at David Baker Architects, which is a local San Francisco architecture firm with numerous sustainability and innovation design awards. Here I am with David Baker, himself, who is sporting a stylish scarf. I want.me_and_baker

It was a casual lunchtime talk with about 15 or 20 people in attendance. An important part of my art practice is talking to organizations that both work outside of the art world and are doing amazing work. I want to share ideas and discuss compelling art ideas with a larger audience.. lunch_audience Here I am, showing my Data Crystals work and explaining the clustering algorithms at work. I later talked about mapping the water infrastructure with my Water Works project.

From this architecture firm, I got positive responses about data and design with in-depth knowledge about urban infrastructure.I hope to continue the code-to-3d prints work with these project. More proposals are in the works.

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Human Brain Project @ Impakt Festival

I spent my time at the five-day long Impakt Festival watching screenings, listening to talks, interacting with artworks and making plenty of connections with both new and old friends. I’m still digesting the deluge of aesthetic approaches, subjective responses and formal interpretations of the theme of the festival, “Soft Machines: Where the Optimized Human Meets Artificial Empathy”.

imapktIt’s impossible to summarize everything I’ve seen. While there were a few duds, like any festival, the majority of what I experienced was high-caliber work. Topping my “best of list” was the “Algorithmic Theater” talk by Annie Dorsen, the Omer Fast film, “5000 Feet is the Best”, the Hohokum video game by Richard Hogg and a captivating talk on the Human Brain Project.

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For the sake of brevity, I’m going to cover just the presentation on the Human Brain Project (HBP). Even though this is a science project, what impressed me was similarities in methodology to many art projects. HBP has simple directive: to map the human brain. However the process is highly experimental and the results are uncertain.

HBP is largely EU-funded and was awarded to a consortium of researchers from a competition with 26 different organizations. The total funding over the course of the 10-year project is about 1 billion Euros, which is a hefty price tag for a research project. The eventual goal, likely well-after the 10 year period will be to actualize a simulated human brain on a computer — an impossibly ambitious project given the state of technology in 2014.

I arrived skeptical, well-aware that technology projects often make empty promises when predicting the future. Marc-Oliver Gewaltig, who is one of the scientists on HBP presented the analogy of 15th-century mapmaking. In 1492, Martin Behaim collected as many known maps of the world as he could, then produced the Erdapfel, a map of the known world at the time. He knew that the work was incomplete. There were plenty of known places but also many uncertain geographical areas as well. The Erdapfel didn’t even include any of the Americas since it was created before the return of Columbus from his first voyage. But, the impressive part was that the Erdapfel was a paradigm shift, which synthesized all geographical knowledge into a single system. This map would then be a stepping stone for future maps.

Carte_behaimAccording to Gewaltig, the mission of the HBP will follow a similar trajectory and aggregate known brain research into a unified, but flawed model. He fully recognizes that the directive of the project, a fully working synthetic human brain is impossible at this point. The computing power isn’t available yet, nor will it likely be there in 10 years.

The human brain is filled with neurons and synapses. The interconnections are everywhere with very little empty space in a brain. Because of this complexity, the HBP project is beginning by trying to simulate a mouse brain, which is within technology’s grasp in the next 10 years.

brain-mapThe rough process is to analyze physical slices of a mouse brain rather than chemical and electrical signals. From this information, they can construct a 3D model of a mouse brain itself using advanced software. For those of you who are familiar with 3D modeling, can you imagine the polygon count?

Gewaltig also made a distinction in their approach from science-fiction style speculation. When thinking about artificial intelligence, we often think of high-level cognitive functions: reasoning, memory and emotional intelligence. But, the brain also handles numerous non-cognitive functions: regulating muscles, breathing, hormones, etc. For this reason, HBP is creating a physical model of a mouse, where it will eventually interact with a simulated world. Without a body, you cannot have a simulated brain, despite what many films about AI suggest.

virtualmouseWhile I still have doubts about the efficacy of the Human Brain Project, I left impressed. The goal is not a successful simulated brain but instead to experiment and push the boundaries of the technology as much as possible. Computing power will catch up some day, and this project will help push future research in the proper direction. The results will be open data available to other scientists. Is that something we can really argue against?