Genetic Portraits and Microscope Experiments

I recently finished a new artwork — called Genetic Portraits — which is a series of microscope photographs of laser-etched glass that data-visualize a person’s genetic traits.

I specifically developed this work as an experimental piece, for the Bearing Witness: Surveillance in the Drone Age show. I wanted to look at an extreme example of how we have freely surrendered our own personal data for corporate use. In this case, 23andMe provides a (paid) extensive genetic sequencing package. Many people, including myself have sent in saliva samples to the company, which they then process. From their website, you can get a variety of information, including their projected likelihood that you might be prone to specific diseases based on your genetic traits.

Following my line of inquiry with other projects such as Data Crystals and Water Works, where I wrote algorithms that transformed datasets into physical objects, this project processes individual’s genetic sequence to generate vector files, which I later use to laser-etch onto microscope slides. The full project details are here.

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Concept + Material
I began my experiment months earlier, before the project was solidified, by examining the effect of laser-etching on glass underneath a microscope. This stemmed from conversations with some colleagues about the effect of laser-cutting materials. When I looked at this underneath a microscope, I saw amazing results: an erratic universe accentuated by curved lines. Even with the same file, each etching is unique. The glass cracks in different ways. Digital fabrication techniques still results in distinct analog effects. 

blog-IMG_4106When the curators of the show, Hanna Regev and Matt McKinley, invited me to submit work on the topic of surveillance, I considered how to leverage various experiments of mine, and came back to this one, which would be a solid combination of material and concept: genetic data etched onto microscope slides and then shown at a macro scale: 20” x 15” digital prints.

Surrendering our Data
I had so many questions about my genetic data. Is the research being shared? Do we have ownership of this data? Does 23andMe even ask for user consent? As many articles point out, the answers are exactly what we fear. Their user agreement states that “authorized personnel of 23andMe” can use the data for research. This sounds officially-sounding text simply means that 23andMe decides who gets access to the genetic data I submitted. 23andMe is not unique: other gene-sequencing companies have similar provisions, as the article suggests.

Some proponents suggest that 23andMe is helping the research front, while still making money. It’s capitalism at work. This article in Scientific American sums up the privacy concerns. Your data becomes a marketing tool and people like me handed a valuable dataset to a corporation, which can then sell us products based on the very data we have provided. I completed the circle and I even paid for it.   

However, what concerns me even more than 23andMe selling or using the data — after all, I did provide my genetic data, fully aware of its potential use — is the statistical accuracy of genetic data. Some studies have reported a Eurocentric bias to the data and The FDA has also has battled with 23andMe regarding the health data they provide. The majority of the data (with the exception of Bloom’s Syndrome) simply wasn’t predictive enough. Too many people had false positives with the DNA testing, which not only causes worry and stress but could lead to customers taking pre-emptive measures such as getting a mastectomy if they mistakenly believe they have are genetically predisposed to breast cancer.

A deeper look at the 23andMe site shows a variety of charts that makes it appear like you might be susceptible (or immune) to certain traits. For example, I have lower-than-odds of having “Restless Leg Syndrome“, which is probably the only neurological disorder that makes most people laugh when hearing about it. My genetic odds of having it are simply listed as a percentage.

Our brains aren’t very good with probabilistic models, so we tend to inflate and deflate statistics. Hence, one of many problems of false positives.

And, as I later discovered, from an empirical standpoint, my own genetic data strayed far from my actual personality. Our DNA simply does not correspond closely enough to reality.

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Data Acquisition and Mapping
From the 23andMe site, you can download your raw genetic data. The resulting many-megabyte file is full of rsid data and the actual allele sequences.

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Isolating useful information from this was tricky. I cross-referenced some of the rsids used for common traits from 23andMe with the SNP database. At first I wanted to map ALL of the genetic data. But, the dataset was complex — too much so for this short experiment and straightforward artwork.

Instead, I worked with some specific indicators that correlate to physiological traits such as lactose tolerance, sprinter-based athleticism, norovirus resistances, pain sensitivity, the “math” gene, cilantro aversion — 15 in total. I avoided genes that might correlate to various general medical conditions like Alzheimer’s and metabolism.

For each trait I cross-referenced the SNP database with 23andMe data to make sure the allele values aligned properly. This was arduous at best.

There was also a limit on physical space for etching the slide, so having more than 24 marks or etchings one plate would be chaotic. Through days of experimentation, I found that 12-18 curved lines would make for compelling microscope photography.

To map the data onto the slide, I modified Golan Levin’s decades-old Yellowtail Processing sketch, which I had been using as a program to generate curved lines onto my test slides. I found that he had developed an elegant data-storage mechanism that captured gestures. From the isolated rsids, I then wrote code which gave weighted numbers to allele values (i.e. AA = 1, AG = 2, GG = 3, depending on the rsid).

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Based on the rsid numbers themselves, my code generated (x, y) anchor points and curves with the allele values changing the shape of each curve. I spent some time tweaking the algorithm and moving the anchor points. Eventually, my algorithm produced this kind of result, based on the rsids.

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The question I always get asked about my data-translation projects is about legibility. How can you infer results from the artwork? Its a silly question, like asking an Kindle engineer to to analyze a Shakespeare play. A designer of data-visualization will try to tell a story using data and visual imagery.

My research and work focuses deep experimentation with the formal properties of sculpture — or physical forms — based on data. I want to push boundaries of what art can look like, continuing the lineage of algorithmically-generated work by artists such as Sol Lewitt, Sonia Rappaport and Casey Raes.

Is it legible? Slightly so. Does it produce interesting results? I hope so.

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But, with this project, I’ve learned so much about genetic data — and even more about the inaccuracies involved. It’s still amazing to talk about the science that I’ve learned in the process of art-making.

Each of my 5 samples looks a little bit different. This is the mapping of actual genetic traits of my own sample and that of one other volunteer named “Nancy”.

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Genetic Traits for Scott (ABOVE)
GENETIC TRAITS FOR NaNCY (BELOW)

genome_scott_notatedWe both share a number of genetic traits such as the “empathy” gene and curly hair. The latter seems correct — both of our hair is remarkably straight. I’m not sure about the empathy part. Neither one of us is lactose intolerant (also true in reality).

But the test-accuracy breaks down on several specific points. Nancy and I do have several differences including athletic predisposition. I have the “sprinter” gene, which means that I should be great at fast-running. I also do not have the math gene. Neither one of these is at all true.

I’m much more suited to endurance sports such as long-distance cycling and my math skills are easily in the 99th percentile. From my own anecdotal standpoint, except for well-trodden genetics like eye color, cilantro aversion and curly hair, the 23andMe results often fail.

The genetic data simply doesn’t seem to be support the physical results. DNA is complex. We know this, it is non-predictive. Our genotype results in different phenotypes and the environmental factors are too complex for us to understand with current technology.

Back to the point about legibility. My artwork is deliberately non-legible based on the fact that the genetic data isn’t predictive. Other mapping projects such as Water Works are much more readable.

I’m not sure where this experiment will go. I’ve been happy with the results of the portraits, but I’d like to pursue this further, perhaps in collaboration with scientists who would be interested in collaboration around the genetic data.

FOUR FINAL SLIDE ETCHINGS  (BELOW)

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Dérive in Paris

The first day after arriving in Paris, we embarked on a dérive — the French word for a “drift” — an unplanned journey (usually) through an urban space. The idea is to immerse yourself in the moment, the now of a city. No maps, no mobile phones, no direction, just walk and make choices on where to go based on your senses: the smells, sights and sounds of a city. This experiment would hopefully be some sort of authentic experience, devoid of the central modes of organization and give us a subjective experience.

I did this once before, in Berlin, while reading Rebecca Solnit’s A Field Guide to Getting Lost. That time was by bicycle and I spent the first day meandering through the city with no direction. Every couple of hours, I’d stop for a cup of coffee or a snack and read Solnit’s book, which covered themes of mental and emotional wandering. It was profound. I noticed odd things, mostly architectural.

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My recommendation is to do this when you first arrive in an unfamiliar city, after getting a night’s sleep but before you’ve done anything else. At this point, your body is still jet-lagged. Daily patterns have yet to be formed. Memories are unestablished. The brain is at its most receptive state.

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We started here, near where we were staying. All I know was that the 6th Arrondissement was on the Left Bank. I’ve since become familiar with the shell-like ordering of the city’s districts.

We picked the direction that we most “liked”, based on whatever looked best down the street.IMG_1179

When you’re not trying to get somewhere or having a conversation about something, you notice funny things, like tons of push-scooters locked with cheap cable locks everywhere.

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Or custom-painted tiles like these. Of course, these are “touristy”, but the walk pushed these labels out of my mind. IMG_1184

I wanted to document the dérive, but didn’t want to be in a documentation state-of-mind, so just snapped photos without much consideration for what I was shooting.IMG_1185

The space-for-women was inviting, but also seemed to be closed. It was some sort of library.IMG_1187

We never would have found this old store on Yelp, but it was incredible. Lots of old science and medical devices and posters were inside! The dérive soon meant that we could go inside shops and here is where my expectations of some sort of 1950s Paris that Guy Debord lived in quickly got dashed on the rocks. There were tons of distracting shops and restaurants everywhere. I guess that was the case 60 years ago as well, but I’m sure capitalist advertising techniques have advanced significantly since his time.IMG_1190

We found some contemporary art galleries, too.IMG_1192

Though the Jesus spinning on the turntable didn’t “work” for me.IMG_1193

With two people, the dérive meant compromising. Sometimes I wanted to walk on one side of the street and Victoria would walk on the other. And when we made a decision, we had to pick one person’s “way” if we disagreed. I’m would have been curious to see where my choices would have left me.IMG_1194

Sure, you notice all sorts of details.IMG_1195

And signs in French, mostly about parking rules.IMG_1196

Interesting chimneys on buildings.IMG_1198

You’re not supposed to stop to do errands, but we had to get some coffee capsules for the espresso machine in our room. And then I noticed the shrink-wrapped cheese. IMG_1201

Wide boulevards with complex intersections. Surprisingly little traffic noise and congestions for a major city.  IMG_1202

Streets signs and greenery.IMG_1203

Plaques with names of historical figures and where they once lived.IMG_1204

The smell of dog shit everywhere. Cigarettes, lots of cigarette smoke. I still hate getting the exhale of smoke in my face.IMG_1206

Many apartment buildings with exactly the same window dressing on them. Why do only the 2nd story windows have planters on them?IMG_1207 Everywhere, ads for various services, including “Tantra Massage” on drain pipes. IMG_1209

A giant old wooden door with intricate carvings.IMG_1210

An old church interspersed amongst the apartment buildings.IMG_1211

Odd urban compositions.IMG_1213

A time portal to the year 1858.IMG_1214

Bubble windows.IMG_1215

Ah, the iron work.IMG_1217

Gold leafing shop. Isn’t it dangerous to leave this in the window for potential thievery?IMG_1218

Real estate ads everywhere. Prices are comparable to San Francisco.IMG_1219

French flags outside what looks like government buildings.

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Lots of small dogs and apparently it’s okay to bring them into the restaurant with you.IMG_1222

Sign for a movie theater…or something else.IMG_1226

The most amazing air vent I’ve ever seen.IMG_1227

Reserving your parking spot with trash.IMG_1228

The stop sign figurine is fatter than the walk sign figurine.IMG_1229

Goats in a park.IMG_1230

One cannot escape the Eiffel Tower as a point of orientation.IMG_1231

Bodily functions rule in the end. The toilets are free, but the lines are long.IMG_1232

Make Art, Not Landfill

This Thursday (June 8, 2015), will be the opening of Make Art, Not Landfill, which is the 25th Anniversary of the Recology Artists in Residence program. If you are in San Francisco, you should go to the show.

I first heard about the program in the late 1990s. In 2010, I saw the 20th Anniversary show, and later that year, applied and was accepted. I started my residency in February 2011. During this time, I made a series called “2049” — where I played the role of a prospector from the year 2049, who was mining the dump for resources to construct “Imaginary Devices” to help me survive.

skl_051811_050These included items such as the Sniffer, the 2049 Hotline, the Universal Mailbox, Reality Simulator and Infinite Power. Each one was accompanied by a blueprint with imaginary symbols on it.

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Using these scavenged items, I built a complex narrative around some sort of future collapse. The work was odd, funny and touched veins of consumption for many people. Dorothy Santos did a writeup for Asterisk Magazine on the 2049 Series, which captured some of the feelings evoked by the sculptures, paintings and videos.

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Part of the deal with being an artist-in-residence at The Dump is that they get to keep one of your artworks. And exhibitions like this are exactly the reason why. The good folks at Recology put on shows, featuring work from their program. The artwork that they elected to retain was the Universal Mailbox (below), which will be in tomorrow’s show.

I constructed the Universal Mailbox from a discarded UPS keypad, scrap wood, a found satellite dish and dryer hose. I found the paint at the dump as well. skl_051811_018 I used a similar technique for the 2049 Hotline, and during the opening, friends of mine played the role of “emissaries from the year 2049″, who would talk to exhibit-goers on the phone. Their only directive was to stay in character — they had to be from the future, but the environment they imagined could be anything they wanted.skl_051711_003The artwork later traveled to the New York Hall of Science for their Regeneration Show (walkthrough below)

This was a one-way mission for many of my sculptures, as they were fragile to begin with and 4 months at an Interactive Science Museum decimated the work. I knew this would happen. I always viewed the sculptures as temporary. I was even able to save some money on shipping costs. The artwork, after all, came from the dump!

skl_051811_001_prsThe blueprints survived, as well as a rebuilt versions of the Universal Mailbox and the 2049 Hotline, which I will continue to exhibit. The 2049 project and my 4 months at the dump was a lesson in attachment to material things, which flow from hands to hands and eventually to landfill and hopefully, sometimes, to art.

Water Works, NPR and Imagination

I recently achieved one of my life goals. I was on NPR!

The article, “Artists In Residence Give High-Tech Projects A Human Touch” discusses my Water Works* project as well as artwork by Laura Devendorf, and more generally, the artist-in-residence program at Autodesk.

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“Water Works” 3D-printed Sewer Map in 3D printer at Autodesk

The production quality and caliber of the reporting is high. It’s NPR, after all. But, what makes this piece important is that it talks about the value of artists, because they are the ones who infuse imagination into culture. The reporter, Laura Sydell, did a fantastic job of condensing this thought into a 6 minute radio program.

Arts funding has been cut out of many government programs, at least in the United States. And education curriculum increasing is teaching engineering and technology over the humanities. But, without the fine arts and teaching actual creativity (and not just startup strategies), how can we, as a society, be truly creative?

Well, that’s what this article suggests. And specifically, that corporations such as Autodesk, will benefit from having artists in their facilities.

Perhaps one problem is that “imagination” is not quantifiable. We have the ability to measure so much: financial impact, number of clicks, test scores and more, but creativity and imagination, not so much. These are — at least to date — aspects of our culture that we cannot track on our phones or run web analytics on.

So, embracing imagination means embracing uncertainty, which is an existential problem that technology will have to cope with along the way.

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“WATER WORKS” Installed in AUTODESK LOBBY

At the end of the article, the reporter talks about Xerox Parc of the 1970s, which had a thriving artist-in-residence program. Early computer technology was filled with imagination, which is why this time was ripe with technology and excitement.

This is close to my heart. My father, Gary Kildall, was a key computer scientist back in the 1970s. His passions when he was in school was mathematics and art. By the time that I was a kid, he was no longer drawing or working in the wood shop. But, instead was designing computer architectures which defined the personal computer. He passed away in 1994, but I often wish he could see the kind of work I’m doing with art + technology now.

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Gary Kildall oN TELEVISION, examining COMPUTER HARDWARE, circa 1981

* Water Works was part of Creative Code Fellowship in 2014 with support from Gray Area, Stamen Design and Autodesk.

EEG Dinner Party @ SXSW

I’m experimenting with a new model for sustainable art practice: leveraging the intellectual property from my technology-infused artworks into lucrative contracts. And why not? Artists are creative engines and deserve to be compensated.

Teaching is how many of my ilk get their income and every professor I’ve talked to about the university-academia track constantly moans about the silo-like environment, the petty politics, the drudgery of the adjunct lifestyle and the low pay. They are overworked and burdened by administration. No thanks.

The other option is full-time work. Recently (2012-13), I was on full-time staff at the Exploratorium as a New Media Exhibit Developer. I love the people, the DIY shop environment and the mission of the organization. It was here that I fully re-engaged with my software coding practice and learned some of the basics about data-visualization. But, ultimately a full-time job meant that I wasn’t making my own artwork. My creative spirit was dying. I couldn’t let this happen, so when my fixed-term job came up, I decided not to try to pursue full-time employment. I now work with the Explo on selected part-time projects.

This year, I started an LLC and in January, I had landed my first contract job, which was to do the software coding, technical design and visitor interaction for a project called “EEG Dinner Party”, which was part of a larger installation for General Electric, which they called the “GE BBQ Research Center” to be presented at SXSW in Austin.

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The folks I directly worked with were Sheet Metal Alchemist (Lara and Sean who run the company, below) — they are fantastic company who build custom-fabrication solutions. They helped General Electric produce this interactive experience for SXSW, which featured a giant BBQ smoker with sensors and the EEG Dinner Party, which was the portion I was working on.

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My “intellectual property” was my artwork, After Thought (2009), which I made while an artist-in-residence at Eyebeam Art + Technology Center in New York. This is a portable personality testing kit using EEG brainwaves and flashcards, where I generate a personal video that expresses your “true” personality. I dressed in a lab coat and directed viewers in a short, 5-10 minute experiment with technology and EEG testing.

afterthought_main-1024x683When the folks at Sheet Metal Alchemist (SMA) contacted me about doing the EEG work, I was confident that I could transform the ideas behind this project — an interactive experience into one that would work for SXSW and General Electric.

From the get-go, I knew this wasn’t my art project and I didn’t have my usual the creative control. For one, General Electric that had a very specific message: “Your Brain on BBQ” and the entire SXSW site was designed as a research lab, of sorts. It was a promotional and branding engine for GE, who provided free meat and beer for the event.

The work that SMA did was just a portion, albeit the attractor (the smoker) and the high-tech demo (EEG) of what was going on, but GE also had videos, displays in vitrines, speakers, DJs and a mix-your-own-BBQ sauce stations. New Creatures were the ones that put the entire event together (check out the video at the end of this post).

The irony: I don’t even eat meat.

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I treaded the delicate balance doing of doing client work combined with my own artistic/tech designs. While I don’t work for GE, nor is their message mine, we’re all in it for a temporary goal: to produce a successful event. The end-result was an odd compromise of social-messaging, technology and visitor experience, which ended up being a very successful installation at the event.

The concept was the we conduct a series of “dinner parties” (it was actually during the day) where two tables of four people each would sit down and eat a 5-minute “meal”. We would track their brainwaves in real-time and generate a graph showing a composite index of what they were experiencing.

All of the event staff costumed ourselves in lab coats. Here I am with the two monitor display, wearing the EEG headset, which we chose: the Muse Headset, which after doing a lot of research, beat the pants off the competitors, Neurosky and Emotiv for its comfort and developer’s API.

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The technical setup took awhile to figure out, but I finally settled upon this system, which was very stable. Each of the eight headsets was paired to a cheap Android tablet. The tablet then streamed the EEG data to two separate Processing applications, one for each table via Open Sound Control (OSC).eegdinnerparty-18The tablet software that I wrote was based on some of the Android sample code from Muse and would show useful bits of information like the battery life and connection status for the 4 headset sensors. Also check out the “Touching Forehead” value. This simple on/off was invaluable and would let us know if the headset was actually on someone’s head. This way, I could run tables of just 1 person or all 4 people at a time.

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Each headset was assigned to a separate graph color and icon. My software then graphed the real-time composite brainwave index over the course of 5 minutes. The EEG signals are alpha, beta, delta, gamma and theta waves. But, showing all of these would be way too much information, so I produced a composite value of all 5 of these, weighting certain waves such as beta and theta waves (stress and meditation) more than others such as alpha (sleep).

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We ran the installation for 3 days. We soon has an efficient setup for registration and social media. You would make a reservation ahead of time and a greeter would fill in the spots on for empty tables.

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The next lab technician would have everyone digitally sign consent forms and ask for their personal information such as your name and Twitter handle.

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We soon had a reasonably-sized line.

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My job was to make sure the technology worked flawlessly. I would clean headsets, check the tablets, do any troubleshooting, as necessary. Fortunately, the installation went off very smoothly. We had just one headset stop working one the 2nd day and on the 3rd day, a drunk guest knocked one of the tablets off the table, shattering it. Of course, we had backups.

After fit all the guests with the headsets and make sure the connections worked, I’d pass the them off to Sean, who talked about EEG signals and answered questions about what the installation was all about. After about 5 minutes, we had people sitting at tables.

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Then, they got served. Food, that is.

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Here is a piece of sausage from the smoker, some coleslaw and a bit of banana cream pudding.
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As folks ate, they watched their brainwaves graph in real-time.

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Each headset was marked with the corresponding color on the graph. One dot was for Table A and two for Table B.eegdinnerparty-3The guests got a kick out of it, that’s for sure.
eegdinnerparty-7And while they consumed food, the photographer shot closeups of people eating.
eegdinnerparty-14If you chose to be at the EEG Dinner Party, you certainly had to have no fear of the media.
eegdinnerparty-16Then, the social media team would do a hand-tracing of the graph and send out an animated image via Twitter, like these.

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Of course, they ended up getting retweeted.

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And we had some celebrities! Here is Questlove.
questloveMy concluding thoughts on artwork-as-IP: it’s solid paid work. My billable rate is at least 3 times higher than any non-profit work that I do, which translates to a more sustainable art practice. My coding skills got sharper — this was my first Android application. I didn’t feel like I had to dial in the fine creativity and was more of a tech lead on the project. So, overall a success and I’m hoping I can do some future paid gigs with my technology-based artwork.

 

*As promised, here is the Hot Wheels Double Dare project, produced by New Creatures.

Panned by 7×7!

“a massive orgy of sugar cubes”…When my artwork gets denigrated like this, I almost always laugh.

My skin isn’t extra-thick, but after the Wikipedia Art project, where I got called a “troll” by Jimmy Wales (in the days before ‘trolling’ was common parlance), I always find humor in the insult.

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In this case it, is my Data Crystals project, which has been called “data popcorn” by my friends. Orgiastic sugar cubes? I’l take it.

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Producing Art via 3D printing

Let’s not get too excited until the reviews come out, but it’s always nice to receive some advance press coverageScreen Shot 2015-03-30 at 10.04.17 PM.

For this upcoming show, which is at the Peninsula Art Museum in Burlingame, I will be presenting my Data Crystals artwork. These have been written about extensively in the press, but not yet shown in an exhibition. That’s how it works sometimes.

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Exhibition Details:

What: “3D Printing: The Radical Shift”
When: April 26 through June 28
Hours: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays
Opening reception: 1-2 p.m. (members only), 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. (general public) April 26
Where: Peninsula Museum of Art, 1777 California Drive, Burlingame

Artist Talk @ Plug-in

Tonight, Victoria Scott and I gave a solid talk at Plug-In Gallery in Winnipeg, with support from Erika Lincoln and the Winnipeg Arts Council.

Here, I am with an old friend, Ken Gregory, artist, hardware hacker and kinetic sculpture of many decades. It was great to see him again after nearly 5 years.

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I co-presented with Victoria, who showed some of her own work as well as some of our collaborative work. We also introduced our ReFILL workshop, which starts tomorrow (!).

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Ken’s artwork is much better than his photography skills. Here, I am partially cut-off. Hey this happens, sometimes. I’ll publish it anyhow.

Otherwise, the talk went great. We got a “Winnipeg reception”, which meant that folks seemed very interested — no cell phone distractions — but at the same time, hardly any questions, either. The feedback was that folks were “reserved”. Ah, welcome to Canada where people are, well…perhaps more genuine.

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I <3 Classroom Artist Talks

Here’s my dirty secret. If you pay me a small stipend, I will come to your class and talk about my artwork. It’s one of my favorite things to do.

Last week, it was Jenny Odell’s class at the San Francisco Art Institute: Probing Social Networks. Her work is smart and I’ve been a fan, so perhaps it’s the case of the mutual admiration society. The two of us finally met in person at an opening at Recology San Francisco, where I was once an artist-in-residence (2011) and where she will soon spend some time digging through trash.

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My “playlist” covered more of the internet-art projects with some discussion of imaginary objects and virtual data:

No Matter (2008)
Second Front (2006-)
Wikipedia Art (2009)
Tweets in Space (2012)
Playing Duchamp (2009)
Data Crystals (2014)
Water Works (2014)
EquityBot (2014)

The classroon talks are relatively easy to do. Very little prep is required since I’ve spoken about all these project oodles of times. I do these talks mostly, because I remember so many of the artists that came through my MFA grad program and each and every one of them helped me develop my art practice. I want to return the favor.

With a high-level class like this, you always get some good questions. The one project that the students seemed most engaged by was EquityBot, which was both surprising — since it’s a stock-investment algorithm and inspiring since it’s my latest project.

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Water Works, Google Translated

My Water Works data-visualization was just featured in MetaTrend Journal (“Big Datification”, Volume 63, March 2015). It’s a subscription model, so you can’t read the article, plus it’s in Korean, which means I definitely can’t read it.

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I did get some partial text emailed to me from the organization and run it through Google translate, which gave me this paragraph:

Water Works project is implemented as a map to visualize 3D printing coming drainage and sewer systems of San Francisco . This is a project of visual artist Scott Kjeldahl data . San Francisco 170 water tanks visualize dozen water tank location (San Francisco Cisterns), 3 million , and visualize data points sewers activity (Sewer Works) and was made ??up of 67 of the most efficient virtual hydrant (Imaginary Drinking Hydrants) Map . Pipes, hydrants , circulation and the supply of urban waterways flow through the location and construction of a sewage treatment plant can see at a glance.

I like it! Once again Google Translate impresses with the odd results and the mangling of phrases.